Northern Michigan Hardwoods
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Nothing But Wood Since 1980
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Unfinished Flooring

Nestled in Northwest Michigan, Northern Michigan Hardwoods is amidst some of the finest hardwood forests in the world. The changing of the seasons creates one of the world's best growing environments for hardwood trees. This allows us to offer the most prized lumber to create beautiful wide plank flooring.

One of the enchanting things about our wide plank flooring is the character it can add to your home, naturally. The rich appearance, distinctive grains, character marks and color variations are the purest expressions of nature. Each plank is just as unique as the tree it came from. No two are alike. Whether it’s in the knots, in the grain or in something like heartwood, the character of your wood plays a major role in the grand scheme of your floor and in making it truly yours.

Ash

ASH

Ash is known for its great strength and excellent workable properties. In the early 1930s, Admiral Richard Byrd wore snowshoes made from ash during his polar expeditions. The color of ash is somewhat lustrous; cream to very light brown heartwood with lighter colored sapwood. Ash has a bold, straight, moderately open grain with occasional wavy figuring. It is similar in grain pattern to red oak. It makes a beautiful floor and is easy to stain. Ash has traditionally been used for baseball bats, oars, and other sporting and athletic goods.










American Cherry

AMERICAN CHERRY

Cherry was used by the Greeks and Romans as long ago as 400 B.C. for furniture making. Cherry helped define American traditional design because Colonial wood workers recognized its superior woodworking qualities. It has a rich reddish brown color that deepens with age and exposure to sunlight. Its exceptionally lustrous appearance almost glows. It’s straight-grained and satiny, and sometimes contains pin knots and gum pockets that give the wood a distinctive character. Its more uniform texture takes a stain very well. Cherry is light, strong, stiff and rather soft compared to maple or hickory.









Maple (Select)

MAPLE (SELECT)

Fascinatingly, in the 1920s, airplane propellers were made from maple, as well as the heels of women’s shoes. Maple has been a favorite of American wood workers since early Colonial days. Maple coloring ranges from cream to light reddish-brown, with a uniform grain and texture. Maple is heavy, hard, strong, tough and stiff with excellent resistance to abrasion and indentation – ideal for wide plank flooring.












Hickory

HICKORY

Hickory is famous for its extreme strength, flexibility and shock resistance. Hickory was at one time used for wagon wheels, and even the Wright Brothers’ historic plane. Hickory displays wide variations in colors, ranging from creamy white to chocolate brown. Hickory is an exceptionally tough, heavy, hard, and strong wood. Hickory makes a beautiful floor and is difficult to stain. It’s a great alternative to oak for people who prefer an open-grained wood, but have tired of the traditional oak look. Hickory has traditionally been used for flooring, meat smoking, ladder rungs, and athletic goods.









Red Oak (Select)

RED OAK (SELECT)

Oak has a long, notable history in furnishings and interior design. It was a favorite of early English craftsmen and a prized material for American colonists. Red oak grows only in North America and is found further north than any other oak species. A red oak grows slowly, taking 20 years to mature and living an average of 300 years.Red Oak ranges from creamy white to a warm, pale brown color, with tints of red. The grain is known for its “rays,” which reflect light and add to its appeal. Depending on the way the logs are sawn into timber (rift cut, flat sliced, flat sawn, rotary cut, quarter sawn), many distinctive and sought after patterns can emerge. Oak is heavy, strong, hard, stiff and durable under exposure. Oaks take a wide range of finishes very well.






White Oak (Select)

WHITE OAK (SELECT)

Oak has a long, notable history in furnishings and interior design. It was a favorite of early English craftsmen and a prized material for American colonists. The grain is known or its “rays,” which reflect light and add to its appeal. Depending on the way the logs are sawn into timber (rift cut, flat sliced, flat sawn, rotary cut, quarter sawn), many distinctive and sought after patterns can emerge. The color ranges from light colored sapwood to dark brown heartwood. Oak is heavy, strong, hard, stiff and durable under exposure. Oaks take a wide range of finishes very well.









White Oak (Character)

WHITE OAK (CHARACTER)

Oak has a long, notable history in furnishings and interior design. It was a favorite of early English craftsmen and a prized material for American colonists. The grain is known for its “rays,” which reflect light and add to its appeal. Depending on the way the logs are sawn into timber (rift cut, flat sliced, flat sawn, rotary cut, quarter sawn), many distinctive and sought after patterns can emerge. The color ranges from light colored sapwood to dark brown heartwood. Oak is heavy, strong, hard, stiff and durable under exposure. Oaks take a wide range of finishes very well.









Birch

BIRCH

Birch is often used as an ornamental tree and has gained the nickname "Mother Tree" because birches were planted at the White House to honor the mothers of U.S. presidents. The oil extracted from the bark contains a chemical used to treat rheumatism and inflammation. Birch is cream or light brown in color tinged with red, with nearly white sapwood. It is very heavy; very strong; hard closed-grained; with an even texture. Some boards may have a curly or wavy grain and may vary greatly in grain and color. Birch makes a beautiful floor but can be difficult to stain. Birch has traditionally been used for furniture, doors, boxes, and woodenware.








Walnut (Select)

WALNUT (SELECT)

Walnut is a beautiful hardwood with a figured grain. Walnut ranges from creamy white to a dark, chocolate brown color. It can contain a lot of character in the grain and looks great in a variety of finishes. Walnut is versatile and popular, since its luster grows over time. Walnut makes a beautiful floor and is well suited for natural finishes. Walnut has traditionally been used for furniture, architectural woodwork, gunstocks, and cabinetry.











  Northern Michigan Hardwoods
   5151 Manthei Rd., Petoskey, MI 49770

   Local 231.347.4575
  Toll Free 888.629.5120

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